How are guns stored in King County homes?

Across all of King County, more than 1 in 5 adults reported keeping a gun in or around their homes, including in a car or other motor vehicle.  But where they lived made a big difference: Keeping a gun at home was least likely in Seattle neighborhoods (14%) and most likely in rural areas in east and south King County, with the highest rate (43%) in Covington / Maple Valley and Newcastle / Four Creeks.

To help gun owners protect their children and neighbors against accidental shooting, access by children, firearm suicides, and firearm theft, Public Health – Seattle & King County is partnering with firearms retailers, elected and tribal leaders, local hospitals, and law enforcement on the LOK-IT-UP safe storage initiative.

The same survey that asked about keeping guns around the home also asked how those guns were stored. In 2015 —

  • 43% of respondents with guns at home (about 150,000 people) said they stored at least one gun unlocked
  • 31% (about 105,000 people) stored at least one gun loaded
  • 15% (about 51,000 people) stored at least one gun unlocked and loaded

So we have room for improvement. While opinions are divided about gun legislation, we are united in wanting our children, families, schools, and communities to be safe.  

For more information about LOK-IT-UP, see the 10/31/2017 Public Health Insider blog; for background information about gun-violence prevention, see King County’s Gun Violence Prevention Initiative. Communities Count has just introduced two new indicators, with interpretive narrative, under the Public Safety topic: Homes with guns  and Carrying weapons at school.  These indicators, plus data on Not feeling safe at school, are also available at Public Health’s Community Health Indicators site. The LOK-IT-UP site provides information on how to get discounts on storage devices and lock boxes through December of 2018.

Live from King County, it’s interactive data!

For the first time, extensive interactive data on health and well-being in King County communities is available on Public Health’s Community Health Indicators website.  This rollout of new data coincides with the release of the 2018/2019 Community Health Needs Assessment for King County Hospitals for a Healthier Community.

Check out some of the new visualizations by clicking on the hyperlinked indicators in the bulleted text below. Once a visualization opens, you can click on the tabs above the title banner (see image above) to explore additional features.

  • Where in King County do more than 40% of households have guns? The cities/neighborhoods tab of the “firearms stored in home” maps the data to 48 sub-county geographies.
  • What proportion of King County residents have “unmet health care needs due to cost”? The summary tab displays a map that shows the range of values at the bottom, describes the data source, and reports the most recent 1-year and 5-year King County averages.
  • What’s the best predictor of a woman getting “early and adequate prenatal care” during pregnancy? In this demographics tab, bar charts compare results by mother’s age, education, race/ethnicity, and location.
  • Since legalization in 2012, how has marijuana use changed among King County adults and teens? Trend tabs show changes over time in King County, for King County regions, by race/ethnicity, and by sexual orientation (for adults).
  • How can you map “tuberculosis incidence” for people who don’t have an address? The Notes and sources tab answers this question and provides additional information and resources about the indicator.

Helpful hints: For legends (including options to select categories/groups and show/hide confidence intervals) see right margin of charts.  Hover over a colored bar, line, or map area to bring up a floating box with detailed information about the data.  Click on a bar, line, or map area to highlight that area; click anywhere else inside the chart to return to your previous view. For illustrated instructions, see this blog from Best Starts for Kids.

If you have questions or comments, please contact data.request@kingcounty.gov.