Updates showcase new “detailed comparisons” feature

Communities Count has posted 10 new data updates – with interpretation – of indicators about EDUCATION and FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT.  Most of these indicators are also posted on Best Starts for Kids Indicators.  Communities Count interprets data with an equity lens and, when possible, in a policy-informed local context.

Although many of these indicators are familiar to Communities Count audiences, using Tableau for data visualization enables us to present more detailed analyses. To introduce you to this feature – and perhaps entice you to explore it more on your own—we preview a few of these detailed comparisons by race and place:

PLACE MATTERS when looking at differences by race-ethnicity. 

  • Kindergarten readiness: Overall, white, multiple-race, and Asian kindergarteners were most likely to be ready in all 6 skill areas.  This pattern was clear in Seattle School District, where 40% of Black children and 70% of white children were “kindergarten-ready.” In other districts, however, Black and white children showed no differences in kindergarten readiness.
    • Tukwila: 52% of both Black and white children were kindergarten-ready.
    • Auburn: 23% for both Black and white children were kindergarten-ready.
  • 3rd grade reading: Overall, only 7% of Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander students met 3rd grade reading standards, but in Auburn School District 41% met standards, almost a 6-fold difference.
  • 4th grade math: Overall, only 20% of American Indian/Alaska Native 4th graders met state math standards.  In Auburn School District, however, 55% met state standards
  • Adolescents with adult support:
    • Across all 4 King County regions, white adolescents reported rates of adult support higher than the county average.
    • For all other race/ethnicity groups, living in South Region was associated with adult support levels below the King County average.
    • And for American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, and Black adolescents, living in Seattle was also associated with below-average adult support; for adolescents in these 3 groups living in East and North regions, however, rates of adults support did not differ from the county average.

 

Here are links to the 10 new updates, with samples of 2 of 3 findings for each:

  • Child care affordability
    • 76% of preschool-aged children (6 months to 5 years old) in King County were in regularly scheduled non-parental childcare. Among the parents/guardians of those children, 69% said their childcare was affordable.
    • 41% of children in kindergarten through 5th grade were in regularly scheduled before- and/or after-school care; among their parents/guardians, 76% said their childcare was affordable.
  • Daily Reading, Singing & Telling Stories to Young Children
    • Overall, 73% of parents/guardians of children age 6 months to 5 years reported reading, singing, or telling stories to their children every day.
    • Daily reading, singing, or telling stories occurred in 45% of households where Spanish was the language most often spoken at home, significantly below the county average.
    • There were no differences by income, education, or King County region.
  • Emotional Support for Parenting
    • 75% of parents and caregivers reported that, during the past 12 months, they had someone to turn to for day-to-day emotional support with parenting or raising children.
    • At 94%, parents of American Indian/Alaska Native children were most likely to report having someone to turn to for day-to-day emotional support for parenting.
    • Parents and caregivers were most likely to have support with parenting if English was the language most commonly spoken at home.
  • Adolescents with Adult Support  [NEW INDICATOR]
    • 75% of King County 8th, 10th, and 12th graders reported having a supportive adult in their neighborhood or community who they “could talk to about something important.”
    • Since 2004, disparities by both race and place – have increased (see trends). Averaging data from 2014 and 2016,
      • 83% of white students could turn to a supportive adult in their neighborhood or community compared to 63% of Latino students.
      • South Region students (69%) were least likely to have an adult they could talk to, compared to 81% of students in East Region.
    • Mother’s education was a strong predictor of whether students had adult support, with more education predicting a greater chance of having support.
  • Youth in School or working  [NEW INDICATOR]
    • Of youth ages 16 to 24 in King County, 90% were connected to their communities either through employment or enrollment in school.
    • At 93%, Seattle had the highest rate of youth engagement.
    • Asian youth had the highest rate (93%) of being in school or employed.
  • Kindergarten Readiness
    • Fewer than half (47%) of King County students entering state-funded, full-day kindergarten had the skills expected for school readiness.
    • Even “next-door neighbors” varied considerably in the proportion of kindergarteners with the skills expected of 5-year-olds, from 21% in Auburn to 58% in neighboring Enumclaw.
    • Children who were white, 2 or more races, or Asian were most likely to display readiness in 6 specific skill areas.
  • 3rd Grade reading
    • 62% of King County 3rd graders met state reading standards.
    • Girls were more likely than boys to meet reading standards.
    • At 83%, 3rd graders in Mercer Island were most likely to meet reading standards, compared to only 36% of students in Highline District.
  • 4th Grade Math
    • 64% of King County 4th graders met state math standards.
    • 4thgraders who qualify for free or reduced-price school meals are considered low-income, and were less likely to meet math standards than those who were not considered low-income (40% vs. 75%).
    • Only 20% of 4th grade students in foster care met math standards.
  • Chronic Absenteeism  [NEW INDICATOR]
    • In the 2014-2015 school year, 14% of King County students were chronically absent.
    • Students who qualified for free or reduced-price school meals were twice as likely to be chronically absent as those who were not low-income (21% vs. 9%, respectively).
    • Highline and Federal Way School Districts reported the highest rate chronic absenteeism (20%); the lowest rate was in Issaquah School District (6%).
  • Child Abuse & Neglect
    • Investigations and assessments by Child Protective Services declined from a high of 9,756 King County households in 2007 to 8,238 in 2016.
    • Similarly, the rate of children in foster care declined from 5.72 per 1,000 in 2000 to 3.44 per 1,000 in 2017.
    • Despite these declines, the likelihood of being placed in out-of-home care in 2017 was disproportionately high for children who were American Indian / Alaska Native, Black / African American, or Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander.

Communities Count is pleased to have new data sources for (i) Child Care; (ii) Reading, Singing & Telling Stories to Children; (iii) Emotional Support for Parenting; (iv) Kindergarten Readiness; and (v) Child Abuse & Neglect.  Previous data came from:

  • The Communities Count Survey (indicators I, ii, and iii); questions about these topics are now included in the Best Starts for Kids Survey, which received responses from a representative sample of almost 6,000 parents and guardians of children from 6 months old through 5th grade! Best Starts for Kids will repeat this survey within the coming year and then again 2 years later.
  • The Early Development Instrument (EDI) (indicator iv), which was replaced by the Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS).
  • The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services’ famlink database (indicator v), which Partners for Our Children, a collaboration between the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, University of Washington School of Social Work, and private sector funding.

Listening to women

On January 21, 2017, an estimated 4.2 million people in the United States participated in the Women’s March, according to the Washington Post. Here in King County, about 134,000 marchers packed a 3.6-mile route from Judkins Park to Seattle Center. The signs they carried echoed a broad set of “Unity Principles” put forth by organizers of the Women’s March on Washington, D.C. – to end violence and support reproductive rights, LGBTQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex, and allies) rights, worker’s rights, civil rights, disability rights, immigrant rights, and environmental justice.

While excluding no one, the agenda was grounded in women’s rights.  From the Unity Principles’ “Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights” to signs marching down streets across America, the message was clear: it was time to LISTEN TO WOMEN.

Unlikely as it seemed last January, women’s voices are being heard at the highest levels of the entertainment and media industries, are echoing through the halls of government, and are even altering the curricula of the nation’s leading business schools.

In some cases, there have already been real consequences.  Allegations of sexual misconduct led to the expulsion of movie mogul Harvey Weinstein’s from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the firing of long-time NBC Today Show host Matt Lauer, and the resignations of Minnesota Senator Al Franken and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray.  Popular actors and athletes have been publicly shamed.

Most of the media coverage concerned actions that may have taken place decades ago, so the risks of speaking up — public embarrassment, loss of career opportunities, and trial by disbelief and innuendo — may have passed. And not much has been heard from women (or men) in low-paying jobs that they can’t afford to leave. Imbalance of power always invites abuse.

But the power structure may also be shifting.  Crosscut reported that Washington voters elected 38 women mayors in November, including 6 in King County cities (Seattle, Auburn, Kent, Black Diamond, Duvall, and Issaquah). And, according to NW News Network, a bipartisan mix of 175 women legislators, lobbyists, and legislative staffers in Olympia have signed a letter calling for improvements in the current process for handling reports of sexual harassment and abuses of power. The letter, titled “Stand With Us,” states, “We have no safe, neutral place to report our experiences.”

This is only a beginning of what will certainly be a long journey.  But there are signs that people making accusations about sexual misconduct may be accorded a new level of respect.  Last week the New York Times reported that while crime rates of all major felony groups in New York City fell to record low levels in 2017, reports of “misdemeanor sex crimes – a catchall for various types of misconduct that includes groping” were up more than 9%, and reports of rape started climbing after widespread publication of accusations against Harvey Weinstein.  Perhaps, standing together, women feel safer speaking out.

And we may soon see a real shift in corporate culture.  According to another recent New York Times article, business schools are teaching students “how to create a workplace culture in which people feel comfortable reporting [sexual harassment].” Perhaps more importantly, they’re acknowledging that behavior in the workplace is an important business issue that transcends gender.

We won’t see changes overnight, but this news hasn’t been lost on the younger generation. Budding stars and power brokers might think twice about actions that could, today or decades in the future, destroy everything they care about. Something big may come from this year of listening to women.

Watch for Communities Count’s upcoming update on domestic violence.

Child poverty moves south from Seattle

Twenty years ago, 1 in 5 Seattle children aged 5-17 years old (>12,000) lived in poverty. Poverty among school-aged Seattle children peaked in 1997 – 13 to 16 years before all school districts in the county experienced recession-linked surges in student poverty.  By the “post-recession” year of 2016, the picture had changed dramatically, according to data prepared by the Census Bureau’s Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE).

The rates and numbers of school-aged children living in poverty have continued to decline in Seattle, and have returned to pre-recession levels in many King County school districts.  But the overall number has increased – from 28,971 in 1997 to 31,259 in 2016 – with most of the increase coming from a cluster of South Region districts that are accommodating the county’s re-distribution of poverty.

On one end of the see-saw, Seattle’s share of the county’s low-income children dropped from 42% in 1997 to 21% in 2016.  On the other end, the South Region school districts of Auburn, Federal Way, Highline, Kent, Renton, and Tukwila, which together contributed only 39% of school-aged poverty in 1997, are now responsible for educating 55% of the county’s students living in poverty.  All 6 districts have double-digit rates of student poverty, from 13% in Kent to 29% in Tukwila.  And none have returned to pre-recession levels of school-aged poverty.

Given the stratospheric rise in Seattle housing costs, it seems likely that child poverty in Seattle schools has declined (down to 10%, from a high of 19%) because poor families couldn’t afford to stay.  Families – and school districts – in Seattle and many East Region cities benefit from the region’s strong economic recovery. In future blogs, we will look school funding, health, and academic progress to see how South Region school districts are coping with an influx of children whose families aren’t doing as well economically.

See recent updates by school district to Communities Count education indicators and Best Starts for Kids indicators.

Taking a knee for justice

Football teams and their fans are conflicted over the practices of kneeling, sitting, joining arms, raising a fist, or staying in the locker room during the National Football League’s (NFL’s) pre-game national anthem ceremonies. The protests began in the wake of the videotaped police shootings of 2 young Black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling.  To draw attention to these events and to issues of racism and injustice, former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick declined to stand while the national anthem was being played at preseason games in 2016.  Over the past 2 football seasons, Kaepernick’s individual protest has gathered both support and condemnation.

Some wonder what the protests are accomplishing.  Back when it all started, in the summer of 2016, Garfield High School football team member Duncan King wondered the same thing. He offered some personal answers in his essay, “Kneeling for a Nation: How One Team’s Participation in a Nationwide Movement Developed into a Force for Local Civic Change.” The essay won a 2017 Stim Bullitt Civic Courage award – and a $5,000 scholarship – from the Seattle Public Library Foundation.

In his essay King discussed the aftermath of his team’s decision to kneel – media attention, Facebook likes, threats of violence (and actual violence), as well as shared introspection about why they chose to kneel: “Common themes were police violence against black males, school segregation and underfunding, and governmental and institutional racism.”  In addition to kneeling on the field, the Garfield team initiated an open discussion with the Seattle Police Department and were invited to the regional conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Local NFL players have also taken action.  Last month Seattle Seahawk Doug Baldwin joined NFL President Roger Goodell in a letter to the U.S. Congress that supported a bill to reduce minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenders.  One quote from the letter emphasizes the deep connections between NFL teams and their home communities:

“When the hometowns of our players or the 32 communities in which our clubs are located are hurting – whether from natural disasters or those that are man-made – so too are our teams. And like most Americans, our owners, players, coaches and clubs spring into action to help. Over the last two seasons, one particular issue that has come to the forefront for our players and our teams is the issue of justice for all…. The bottom line is, that we all want to make our communities better.”

To provide a platform for maintaining a clear focus on free speech and collective action, Seahawks player Michael Bennett joined other athletes in founding Athletes for Impact (A4I), a new organization to “build an inclusive and global network of athletes committed to equity and social change.” Bennett’s reach extends beyond an elite circle of athletes: a recent pregame ESPN video featured his volunteer work with youth at King County’s Juvenile Detention Facility.

On the field and off, in Seattle and across the nation, football players find themselves in an unfamiliar and possibly uncomfortable spotlight.  American heroes by definition, until recently all they had to do was play the game.  Now, under intensive scrutiny by the media and even the President, they’re having to take a stand.

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Essay submissions for the 2018 Stimson Bullitt Civic Courage Scholarship Competition will be accepted from January 1 to March 15. More information can be found at the Seattle Public Library Foundation.

Communities Count provides data on racial disparities for almost every indicator, including income, wealth, on-time graduation, and public safety.  In 2011-2015, the homicide rate among King County Blacks was 5.2 times the county average (forthcoming on Communities Count).  And in 2016, race/ethnicity/ancestry accounted for 62% of the motivations for hate crimes in reported by Washington Association of Sheriffs & Police Chiefs. Communities Count will update hate crime data for King County in early 2018.

La La Land on economic equality

Yale University researchers recently revealed a striking mismatch between perceptions of inequality and actual inequality.  Asked to estimate progress toward black-white economic equality, participants in several studies consistently overestimated racial equality for annual income, wealth, employee benefits, and hourly wages.  “The headline finding,” according to City Observatory, “is that the average respondent thinks that black wealth is about 80 percent that of whites; whereas Census data suggest that black wealth is about 5 percent that of whites.”

As reported by The New York Times, the study’s authors attribute these overestimates of racial economic equality to several factors:  continued economic and racial segregation, unconscious denial of a reality that doesn’t fit our idealized version of a fair democracy, and overgeneralization from other signs of progress toward racial equality (such as passage of civil rights laws and election of a black president). Blacks and whites alike overestimated economic equality, but estimates made by wealthy whites were furthest from the mark.

Although the Yale researchers didn’t collect data on geographic differences in perceptions of racial inequality, we can compare racial economic inequality in King County to national figures.  While the national black/white income gap is substantial ($22,794 in 2016, according to the American Community Survey), it pales in comparison to King County’s whopping 2016 disparity of $45,733.

And the disparity in King County has gotten worse.  Nationally, from 2006 to 2016 median household income grew by about 19% for blacks and for whites, preserving a consistent (and large) racial gap: at both times blacks earned $63 for every $100 earned by whites.  Over the same period in King County, black median income grew by 20%, lagging considerably behind the 36% growth of white median income.  While in 2006 King County blacks earned $56 for every $100 earned by whites, by 2016 the gap had widened, with King County blacks earning only $50 for every $100 earned by whites.

Many King County residents support the goal of achieving economic security for all.  Before we can do that, however, we first need to acknowledge our increasing racial disparities in the face of explosive economic growth.  Only then will we be able to rationally make policy choices that will move our region toward greater equity.

Communities Count has just updated King County data on income by race/ethnicity, and also presents recent national wealth trends by race/ethnicity and national black/white wealth trends for the cohort born between 1943 and 1951 (in their 30s, the mean wealth of whites in this cohort exceeded the wealth of blacks by less than $150,000; by the time they reached their 60s, the difference had grown to more than $1 million).  Other data on economic inequality can be found in a data spotlight, The rising fortunes of the top 1%, and charts on wealth trends by income tier.