Income >> Poverty >> Suburban Poverty

Suburban poverty gains momentum in Puget Sound region.

Wealth is the flip side of poverty, which the United Nations defines as “a denial of choices and opportunities, a violation of human dignity.” A living wage opens the door to choice and opportunity.  The distribution of wealth can enhance or undermine a society’s collective dignity. 

From 2000 to 2013, suburban poverty in the Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue metropolitan region grew almost 3 times as fast as urban poverty.  

  • The number of suburban households below the federal poverty threshold doubled from 154,769 (7.2%) in 2000 to 309,293 (11.9%) in 2013.
  • Growth of suburban poverty in our region echoes a national trend.  Nationally, however, suburban poverty seems to be leveling off, while locally it’s gathering momentum.