Safety

Public Safety: Summary & Data Highlight

Crime 

  • By 2011, King County’s Index Crime Rate had decreased to 4,419 per 1000,000 population -- less than half the rate in 1987.
  • From 2007 to 2011, major violent crime declined in unincorporated King County, in all city-defined regions, and in King County overall.
  • Disparities in homicide rates persist – by race, gender, poverty, and region.
  • Property crime continues to decline across King County. 

Domestic Violence 

  • 59% of King County’s 10,157 reported domestic violence offenses reported in 2011 were simple assaults; South Region cities had the highest 5-year average (2007-2011) of domestic violence simple assault.  Between 2004 and 2011, rates fell in King County overall and in Seattle, South Region cities, and unincorporated areas. 
  • 23% of domestic violence offenses reported in 2011 were violations of protection orders; the 5-year average was highest for South Region cities and lowest for East Region cities.  Between 2004 and 2011, rates fell in King County overall and in Seattle, South Region cities, and unincorporated areas. 
  • 12% of domestic violence offenses reported in 2011 were considered major domestic violence (murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault); 5-year rates were highest for Seattle and lowest for East Region cities.  From 2004 to 2011, the rate declined in East Region cities but did not change in King County overall. 
  • From 2000 to 2012, the rate of accepted referrals to Child Protective Services did not change.

Perceived Safety

  • In all regions of King County, residents reported feeling safer in 2011 than they had in 2004. This trend continued in the 2007-2011 for residents of East and North Regions, but not for residents of Seattle or South Region.
  • Whites and non-Hispanics worried about safety less than people of color.
  • Adults born in the U.S. and those whose first language was English worried about safety less than adults born in the U.S. and those whose primary language was not English.